You asked: What overlooks the valley of ashes What might they symbolize?

What is the valley of ashes literally and symbolically?

Literally, the valley of ashes is the place that ashes grow everywhere. It symbolizes the poverty and hopelessness.

What is associated with the valley of ashes?

What Is the Valley of Ashes in The Great Gatsby? The valley of ashes is the depressing industrial area of Queens that is in between West Egg and Manhattan. It isn’t actually made out of ashes, but seems that way because of how gray and smoke-choked it is.

What is the valley of ashes and how is it described?

The Valley of Ashes is the section between East Egg and New York City. It is described in Chapter 2 as Tom and Nick approach it on their way to pick up Myrtle Wilson at her husband’s garage. The Valley of Ashes is described as being a dirty place with many factories and buildings.

What is the valley of ashes in The Great Gatsby answers?

The Valley of Ashes is the wasteland between the east and west egg. It is where the lower class lives. It symbolizes Wilson and how he is made of ashes because he repairs cars and can’t achieve the American dream.

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What is the valley of Ashes What might it represent on a symbolic level?

What might it represent on a symbolic level? The valley of ashes is the railroads, houses and chimneys. On a symbolic level it represents absolute poverty and hopelessness.

Who lives in the valley of Ashes Chapter 2?

T. J. Eckleburg, an eye doctor. The billboard is a set of giant eyes that seems to be surveying or judging everything below. Tom’s mistress lives in this “ash heaps” area. One day, when Nick takes the train with Tom to Manhattan, Tom suddenly makes him get off at a random stop to meet her.

What are 5 words that reflect the valley of ashes?

The words that are used are: grotesque, ashes, crumbling, and rising smoke.

What page is the valley of Ashes quote on?

Nick describes the valley of ashes as a place of despair whose working men “move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.” It is a place where dreams die and ugly truths unfold. In the Scribner, New York, 2004, edition of the novel, the passage to which you seem to refer begins on page 23.