How do I trademark a phrase?

How much does it cost to trademark a phrase?

If you have ever asked yourself how much does it cost to trademark a phrase, according to the current fee schedule on the USPTO, trademark registration fees cost $275 per mark per class. If you need an attorney’s assistance, the cost averages around $1,000 to $2,000.

Can you copyright a phrase or saying?

Copyright does not protect names, titles, slogans, or short phrases. In some cases, these things may be protected as trademarks.

Is it worth it to trademark a phrase?

Is it Worth it to Trademark a Phrase? If you are using a catch phrase, tag line, or sales line with your goods or services, then yes, it is almost always worth it to trademark that phrase if it is available.

How long does trademark last?

How long does a trademark last in the US? In the United States, a federal trademark can potentially last forever, but it has to be renewed every ten years. If the mark is still being used between the 5th and the 6th year after it was registered, then the registration can be renewed.

IT IS IMPORTANT:  Quick Answer: Does Nike Own the Mamba logo?

Do I have to register a slogan?

You can’t trademark a slogan that just describes your company’s goods or services. This doesn’t usually meet the USPTO’s requirements. You can adopt a slogan for your brand without filing out a trademark application. If you want to keep others from using it, however, you should trademark the slogan.

How do you legally protect a phrase?

You can trademark a phrase at the local level by applying at your state trademark office. To trademark a phrase locally, you must already be using the phrase publicly. You can apply for a nationwide trademark with the USPTO. With the USPTO you can apply with the “intent to use.”

Can you trademark a phrase on a T shirt?

If your T-shirt design has symbols, words, or other marks that uniquely distinguish it from other T-shirts on the market you can obtain a trademark to protect your design from others who might wish to capitalize on your intellectual property.

How do you tell if a phrase is trademarked?

You can search all applied-for and registered trademarks free of charge by using the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO)‘s Trademark Electronic Search System (TESS). If your mark includes a design element, you will have to search it by using a design code.

Can you trademark phrases?

Common words and phrases can be trademarked if the person or company seeking the trademark can demonstrate that the phrase has acquired a distinctive secondary meaning apart from its original meaning. That secondary meaning must be one that identifies the phrase with a particular good or service.

When should you trademark a phrase?

In the digital age, phrases can spread and catch on quickly that you might see your phrase on a t-shirt in ASOS or on a popular website. For that reason, if you do have an exceptional phrase, you should consider trademark registration.

IT IS IMPORTANT:  What national symbols does Russia use?

Can you use a phrase that is not trademarked?

The answer is yes – a catchphrase can be trademarked, but only for the protection of its use in connection with a particular product or services. … The mere act of speaking a catchphrase isn’t, on its own, an act of commerce, so a trademark wouldn’t cover or protect you from someone else just saying your phrase.

What are the 3 types of trademarks?

There are four categories of trademarks: (1) fanciful or arbitrary, (2) suggestive, (3) descriptive, and (4) generic.

Why do Trademarks not expire?

Unlike patents and copyrights, trademarks do not expire after a set period of time. Trademarks will persist so long as the owner continues to use the trademark. Once the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO), grants a registered trademark, the owner must continue to use the trademark in ordinary commerce.

Can I trademark my stage name?

Yes, you can trademark a stage name that you use to promote or sell your products or services. If a stage name is trademarked then it will prevent another individual from performing similar services under the same name.